Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.


Quarter 1

Quarter 2

Quarter 3

Quarter 4

Use addition and subtraction within 10 to solve word problems
involving situations of:
  • adding to
  • taking from
  • putting together
  • taking apart
  • comparing

Concrete – Picture – (Numbers/Symbols)
Use addition and subtraction within 10 to solve word problems
involving situations of:
  • adding to
  • taking from
  • putting together
  • taking apart
  • comparing

Concrete – Picture – (Numbers/Symbols)
Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems
involving situations of:
  • adding to
  • taking from
  • putting together
  • taking apart
  • comparing

Concrete - Picture - Numbers/Symbols
Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems
involving situations of:
  • adding to
  • taking from
  • putting together
  • taking apart
  • comparing

Picture - Numbers/Symbols
(footnote about problem structures progression)

Enduring Understanding
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Draw a number line on a plastic bag with a sharpie. Use the slider to manipulate the calculation. Click the picture for more info.

Mathematical operations are used in solving problems in which a new value is produced from one or more values.
Algebraic thinking involves choosing, combining, and applying effective strategies for answering quantitative questions.

Essential Questions

In what ways can operations affect numbers?
How can different strategies be helpful when solving a problem?

Vocabulary (online dictionary, HCPSS Vocabulary Cards)

Addition, add, subtraction, subtract, equation


About the Math

Word problems can involve different problem situations. Often students are presented problems that repreproblem_situations.pngsent one or two situations. Because of this students, begin to develop procedural approaches to solving problems.

Illustrative Mathematics Project Example

At the Park

Boys and Girls v1

Boys and Girls v2

20 Tickets







Finding a Chair

Maria's Money

Measuring Blocks

Field Day Scarcity







School Supplies

Sharing Markers

The Pet Snake

Link-Cube Addition

Research indicates that using bar diagrams can help students develop understanding of problems and how to solve them.

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This brief overview shares examples of the bar diagram method.
Bar Diagrams are similar to part-part-whole maps.
In this example the 2 amounts are joined to find a total (41).






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Rich Tasks for Multiple Means of Engagement, Expression, and Representation (UDL)


Provide opportunities for students to participate in shared problem-solving activities to solve word problems.

Collaborate in small groups to develop problem-solving strategies using a variety of models such as drawings, words, and equations with symbols for the unknown numbers to find the solutions. Additionally students need the opportunity to explain, write, and reflect on their problem-solving strategies. The situations for the addition and subtraction story problems should involve sums and differences less than or equal to 20 using the numbers 0 to 20.

Students need the opportunity of writing and solving story problems involving three addends with a sum that is less than or equal to 20. For example, each student writes or draws a problem in which three whole things are being combined. The students exchange their problems with other students, solving them individually and then discussing their models and solution strategies. Now both students work together to solve each problem using a different strategy. CENTER ACTIVITY: Students can write their problems at a center. -or- Students can write their problems on note cards and leave them at a center for other students to solve at a later date.

Literature is a wonderful way to incorporate problem-solving in a context that young students can understand.
ANY book can be used as a context for a problem. This allows teachers to integrate any topic into mathematics class. As the teacher reads the story, students use a variety of manipulatives, drawings, or equations to model and find the solution to problems from the story.

Journal Prompts:

  • Juan has 8 toy cars. Some are blue and some are red. How many are blue? How many are red? Show as many different solutions as you can.
  • Leah's mom baked 9 pies. Some were apple and some were peach. How many were apple? How many were peach? Show as many different solutions as you can.
  • John had 6 coins in his pocket. He lost some. How many did he lose? How many did he have left? Show as many different combinations as you can.
  • Andrew had 7 marbles. His sister gave him some more and then he had 11 marbles. How many did Andrew's sister give him? Explain your thinking.
Differentiation:Don't let computation concerns interfere with students exposure to problems. Students can be given fact charts, number lines, hundred charts, or calculators to support computational skills. Problems can be differentiated by giving students number sets to choose from when solving problems.
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Print Resources (Addition):

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Brain Compatible Activities for Mathematics K-1
(30-32, 44-49)

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Developing Mathematics with Unifix Cubes:
(78-85), Lizard Land Money Game (60-63)

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Roads to Reasoning (Grade 1):
Action Figures (16-19), Nick's Age (62-63),
Pool Party (76-77),Zoo Visit (68-69)






Print Resources (Subtraction):

brainactivitiesk-1.png
Brain Compatible Activities for Mathematics K-1
(33-35)

developingunifix.png
Developing Mathematics with Unifix Cubes:
(78-85), It's Tax Time in Hawaii 3-0 (68-69),
Lizard Land Tax Game (63-65)

roadstoreasoninggrade1.png
Roads to Reasoning (Grade 1):
Cookies and Milk (66-67), Fly Away (20-21)






Web Resources:
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Games and Centers
Lessons
Student Resources
Video Segments
Printable Centers
Double Decker Bus Problem
Making Apple Ten Packs
Domino Addition


Online GamesRabbit SubtractionThinking Blocks Word Problems
Bar Model Addition/Subtraction
Lesson Plans
Do it With Dominoes

How Many More Fish?

Let's Learn Those Fact

Take Away

What's My Number

Comparing Connecting Cubes

Modeling Subtraction

Sample Problems
Addition Word Problems
Subtraction Word Problems
Sample Problems
Solving a Math Word Problem





Connecting to Children's Literature:

Click on the book to download the task.
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Rooster's Off to See the World
By: Eric Carle
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One Duck Stuck
by: Phyllis Root
one_hunter.png
1 Hunter
By: Pat Hutchins
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The Very Hungry Caterpillar
By: Eric Carle
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Two of Everything
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Domino Addition Directions
Domino Addition Recording Sheet





Questions/Comments:

Contact John SanGiovanni at jsangiovanni@hcpss.org.


Use and Sharing of HCPSS Website and Resources:Creative_Commons.png
Howard County Public Schools Office of Elementary Mathematics Curricular Projects has licensed this product under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.